Shore Health Systems
Shore Health System

Information

Tel. 410-822-1000, ext 5532
Tel. 410-228-5511, ext 2111
Tel. 410-822-1000, ext. 5845

Specialty Services

Requard Center for Acute Rehabilitation
410-822-1000 ext 5845
410-822-1000 ext 5873
866-414-2067 (Toll Free)

Balance Center
15 Sunburst Center, Cambridge
Tel (Direct): 410-221-0029
Tel: 410-228-5511, ext. 2122

Lokomat Robotic Gait Rehabilitation
10B Martin Court, Easton
Tel: 410-822-3080, ext. 2525

Shore Health System Swallowing Center
10B Martin Court, Easton
Tel: 410-822-1000, ext. 2525
or 410-822-3080

Inpatient Services

Dorchester General Hospital
300 Byrn Street
Cambridge, MD 21613
Tel: 410 228-5511, ext. 8363

The Memorial Hospital
219 S. Washington Street
Easton, MD 21601
Tel: 410 822-1000, ext. 5532

Outpatient Services

Center for Integrative Medicine
607 Dutchman's Lane, Ste. B
Easton, MD 21601
Tel: 410 770-9400

Shore Rehabilitation of Cambridge
15 Sunburst Center
Cambridge, MD 21613
Tel: 410 221-0029

Shore Rehabilitation of Denton
920 Market Street
Denton, MD 21629
Tel: 410 479-3300

Shore Rehabilitation of Easton
10B Martin Court
Easton, MD 21601
Tel: 410 822-3080

Shore Rehabilitation of Queenstown
125 Shoreway Drive, Suite 280
Queenstown, MD 21658
Tel: 410 827-3818
Fax: 410 827-7635
Our speech language pathology (SLP) services

Speech Language Pathology Services

The filed of Speech and Language Pathology (SLP) encompasses assessment and treatment across three distinct fields of study. Swallowing, Speaking and Communication. Patients with swallowing disorders, speech- language disorders and cognitive-linguistic disorders can benefit from a variety of assessment and treatment techniques provided across the continuum of care.

Swallowing disorders, also called dysphagia, can occur at different stages in the swallowing process:

General signs/symptoms of dysphagia may include:

VitalStim©

VitalStim© Therapy uses small electrical currents to stimulate the muscles responsible for swallowing. At the same time, trained specialists help patients "re-educate" their muscles through rehabilitation therapy.

Speech and Language Disorders:

Aphasia is a disorder that results from damage to the parts of the brain that contain language. Aphasia causes problems with any or all of the following: speaking and/or writing ("expressive aphasia"), listening and reading ("receptive aphasia")

Characteristics of Expressive Aphasia

Dysarthria is a motor speech disorder. The muscles of the mouth, face, and respiratory system may become weak, move slowly, or not move at all after a stroke or other brain injury. The type and severity of dysarthria depend on which area of the nervous system is affected.

Signs/Symptoms of dysarthria include:

Apraxia is a general term. It can cause problems in parts of the body, such as arms and legs. Apraxia of speech is a motor speech disorder. It is caused by damage to the parts of the brain related to speaking. Other terms include apraxia of speech, acquired apraxia of speech, verbal apraxia, and dyspraxia.People with apraxia of speech have trouble sequencing the sounds in syllables and words. The severity depends on the nature of the brain damage.

Signs/symptoms of apraxia include:

Cognitive-Linguistic Disorders

Cognitive-communication problems that can occur from damage to certain areas of the brain include difficulty with the following:

Attention: difficulty concentrating on a task and paying attention for more than a few minutes at a time. Doing more than one thing at a time may be difficult or impossible.

Left-side neglect: a form of attention deficit. Essentially, the individual no longer acknowledges the left side of his/her body or space. These individuals will not brush the left side of their hair, for example, or eat food on the left side of their plate, as they do not see them or look for them. Reading is also affected as the individual does not read the words on the left side of the page, starting only from the middle.

Memory: problems remembering information, such as street names or important dates, and learning new information easily.

Orientation: difficulty recalling the date, time, or place. The individual may also be disoriented to self, meaning that he/she cannot correctly recall personal information, such as birth date, age, or family names.

Organization: trouble telling a story in order,giving directions, or maintaining a topic during conversations.

Problem solving: difficulty responding appropriately to common events, such as a car breakdown or overflowing sink. Leaving the individual unsupervised may be dangerous in such cases, as he or she could cause injury to himself or herself, or others.

Reasoning: difficulty interpreting abstract language, such as metaphors, or responding to humor appropriately.

Social communication (pragmatics): problems understanding nonverbal cues and following the rules of communication (e.g., saying inappropriate things, not using facial expressions, talking at the wrong time).

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